The multi storey car park

I watch. Helpless. My baby vacantly runs with nowhere to go. Effortlessly he climbs onto the car park wall, about to leap over to…to the ground far below. Before my feet can move I open my mouth and scare myself with the sound that comes out.

A review of the book, Talking Autism parenting your unique child by Victoria Hatton

When Victoria Hatton asked for people to review her book, Talking Autism, I jumped at the chance. I respect Victoria as a fellow blogger with like-minded views to my own and was sure her book would live up to my expectations. Victoria is the founder and coach at Autism Consultancy International and has spent 20 years working with autistic children and young people across a range of settings.

Keeping autistic teenagers safe online

Whilst there is a danger with all teens, autistic teens seem to be particularly at risk. Some struggle greatly making friends in person and find it easier to chat online and some struggle with social skills. Some may not understand the chats so are more vulnerable than their peers.
A lot of autistic teenagers take things literally and can believe what they are told. This could be very dangerous as a stranger telling a child they are their friend and the same age as them could be taken as fact.

Helping autistic children cope with school at the end of the academic year

Its nearly the end of term and things are winding down for Summer. Work is getting less and fun is getting more. Children are more excited, louder. Special days are arranged such as non uniform days, sports days, fun days, school plays, school trips and summer fairs. It’s been sunny so everyone has to wear sun cream and bring hats to wear at playtime. There are short visits to new classrooms to meet new teachers and promises of all things different in September.

On the other side of the door.

I listened, from the other side of the door. Leave him they said, he will be fine. We will deal with him. You go home.”

Go home they said. I was to go home with feelings of being helplessly pushed out of my child’s life at a time when he needed me most, the same feelings as every day.

10 top tips for safeguarding autistic children on days out

On trips out there is always the possibility of a child wandering off or becoming lost. When you have autistic children they may not be able to communicate with strangers that they are lost. They may not be able to learn how to find a safe person. They may be prone to running if they are upset or scared. All of these things can be concerning to parents when taking their child out for the day. Here are our ten top tips for safeguarding autistic children on days out.

A visit to hospital, part two

It is 10pm and we have just arrived home from hospital. The day progressed as you would expect, with my son becoming hungrier and tired. We watched two films and played cards for a bit before he got quite tearful and generally fed up.

A visit to hospital, part one

I am writing this from a hospital room where we are based for the day. My son is in for day surgery and I am already seeing some of the potential problems with taking an autistic child to hospital for surgery so thought it may be useful to share our experience with you.

Celebrating Eid Al-Fitr with autistic children

For autistic children Eid Al-Fitr can be an overwhelming time. Autistic children are even sometimes excluded from celebrations in case of meltdown or embarrassing behaviour.

Here are some ideas to help your autistic child celebrate Eid Al-Fitr.